Ten years retrospective data analysis reveals frequent respiratory co-infections in hospitalized patients in Augsburg

  • Clinical data on the types of respiratory pathogens which are most frequently engaged in respiratory co-infections of children and adults is lacking. We analyzed 10 years of data on a total of over 15,000 tests for 16 viral and bacterial pathogens detected in clinical samples at the University hospital of Augsburg, Germany. Co-infection frequencies and their seasonal patterns were examined using a proportional distribution model. Co-infections were detected in 7.3% of samples, with a higher incidence in children and males. The incidence of inter-bacterial and inter-viral co-infections was higher than expected, whereas bacterial-viral co-infections were less frequent. H. influenzae, S. pneumoniae, rhinovirus, and RSV were most frequently involved. Most co-infections occurred in winter, but distinct summer peaks were also observed, which occurred even children, albeit less pronounced than in adults. Seasonality of respiratory (co-)infections decreased with age. Our results to adjustClinical data on the types of respiratory pathogens which are most frequently engaged in respiratory co-infections of children and adults is lacking. We analyzed 10 years of data on a total of over 15,000 tests for 16 viral and bacterial pathogens detected in clinical samples at the University hospital of Augsburg, Germany. Co-infection frequencies and their seasonal patterns were examined using a proportional distribution model. Co-infections were detected in 7.3% of samples, with a higher incidence in children and males. The incidence of inter-bacterial and inter-viral co-infections was higher than expected, whereas bacterial-viral co-infections were less frequent. H. influenzae, S. pneumoniae, rhinovirus, and RSV were most frequently involved. Most co-infections occurred in winter, but distinct summer peaks were also observed, which occurred even children, albeit less pronounced than in adults. Seasonality of respiratory (co-)infections decreased with age. Our results to adjust existing testing strategies during high-incidence periods.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Martin Krammer, Reinhard HoffmannGND, Hans-Georg Ruf, Avidan U. Neumann, Claudia Traidl-HoffmannORCiDGND, Mehmet Goekkaya, Stefanie Gilles
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:384-opus4-1134019
Frontdoor URLhttps://opus.bibliothek.uni-augsburg.de/opus4/113401
ISSN:2589-0042OPAC
Parent Title (English):iScience
Publisher:Elsevier BV
Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2024
Publishing Institution:Universität Augsburg
Release Date:2024/06/08
Volume:27
Issue:6
First Page:110136
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.isci.2024.110136
Institutes:Medizinische Fakultät
Medizinische Fakultät / Universitätsklinikum
Medizinische Fakultät / Lehrstuhl für Mikrobiologie
Medizinische Fakultät / Lehrstuhl für Umweltmedizin
Dewey Decimal Classification:6 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / 61 Medizin und Gesundheit / 610 Medizin und Gesundheit
Licence (German):CC-BY 4.0: Creative Commons: Namensnennung (mit Print on Demand)