One year of the COVID-19 pandemic in dental medical facilities in Germany: a questionnaire-based analysis

  • (1) Background: The COVID-19 pandemic forced healthcare workers to adapt to challenges in both patient care and self-protection. Dental practitioners were confronted with a potentially high possibility of infection transmission due to aerosol-generating procedures. This study aims to present data on healthcare worker (HCW) screening, infection status of HCWs, pre-interventional testing, the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and the economic impact of the pandemic in dental facilities. (2) Methods: Dental facilities were surveyed nationwide using an online questionnaire. The acquisition of participants took place in cooperation with the German Society for Dentistry, Oral and Maxillofacial Medicine. (3) Results: A total of 1094 private practices participated. Of these, 39.1% treated fewer than 600 patients per quarter and 59.9% treated over 600 patients per quarter. Pre-interventional testing was rarely performed in either small (6.6%) or large practices (6.0%). Large practices(1) Background: The COVID-19 pandemic forced healthcare workers to adapt to challenges in both patient care and self-protection. Dental practitioners were confronted with a potentially high possibility of infection transmission due to aerosol-generating procedures. This study aims to present data on healthcare worker (HCW) screening, infection status of HCWs, pre-interventional testing, the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and the economic impact of the pandemic in dental facilities. (2) Methods: Dental facilities were surveyed nationwide using an online questionnaire. The acquisition of participants took place in cooperation with the German Society for Dentistry, Oral and Maxillofacial Medicine. (3) Results: A total of 1094 private practices participated. Of these, 39.1% treated fewer than 600 patients per quarter and 59.9% treated over 600 patients per quarter. Pre-interventional testing was rarely performed in either small (6.6%) or large practices (6.0%). Large practices had a significantly higher incidence of at least one SARS-CoV-2-positive HCW than small practices (26.2% vs.14.4%, p < 0.01). The main source of infection in small practices was the private environment, and this was even more significant in large practices (81.8% vs. 89.7%, p < 0.01). The procedure count either remained stable (34.0% of small practices vs. 46.2% of large practices) or decreased by up to 50% (52.6% of small practices vs. 44.4% of large practices). Revenue remained stable (24.8% of small practices vs. 34.2% of large practices) or decreased by up to 50% (64.5% of small practices vs. 55.3% of large practices, p = 0.03). Overall, employee numbers remained stable (75.5% of small practices vs. 76.8% of large practices). A vaccination readiness of 60–100% was shown in 60.5% (n = 405) of large practices and 59.9% (n = 251) of small practices. (4) Conclusion: Pre-interventional testing in dental practices should be increased further. Economic challenges affected small practices as well as large practices. Overall, a steady employee count could be maintained. Vaccination readiness is high in dental practices, although with some room for improvement.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Stephan Zellmer, Ella Bachmann, Anna Muzalyova, Alanna Ebigbo, Maria Kahn, Claudia Traidl-HoffmannORCiDGND, Roland Frankenberger, Fabian M. Eckstein, Thomas Ziebart, Axel Meisgeier, Helmut MessmannGND, Christoph Römmele, Tilo Schlittenbauer
URN:urn:nbn:de:bvb:384-opus4-916214
Frontdoor URLhttps://opus.bibliothek.uni-augsburg.de/opus4/91621
ISSN:1660-4601OPAC
Parent Title (English):International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Publisher:MDPI
Editor:Paul B. Tchounwou
Type:Article
Language:English
Date of first Publication:2021/12/24
Publishing Institution:Universität Augsburg
Release Date:2022/01/05
Tag:COVID-19; dentistry; healthcare
Volume:19
Issue:1
First Page:19
DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19010175
Institutes:Medizinische Fakultät
Medizinische Fakultät / Universitätsklinikum
Medizinische Fakultät / Lehrstuhl für Umweltmedizin
Medizinische Fakultät / Lehrstuhl für Innere Medizin mit Schwerpunkt Gastroenterologie